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"Active Archives Initiative: Automatic Annotation of documents in digital archives"
Faculty Advisor: Kurt Fendt
Mentor(s):
Contact e-mail: fendt@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
The growing availability of digitized and born-digital documents calls for a rethinking of digital archives that transform read-only repositories into sites of “story-making”, thus adding a new level of scholarly discourse. The Active Archives Initiative is an attempt to turn a digital archive into a generative, participatory resource that fosters discovery, interpretation, and re-organization of archived materials to construct new representations.

Develop new modules for HyperStudio’s suite of Repertoire components written in Javascript, CSS, and Ruby on Rails. New modules will automatically “machine read” existing or ingested texts, extract entities, semantics, and link concepts via existing vocabularies. Modules will be used in two of HyperStudio’s archival projects: “US-Iran Relations - Missed Opportunities” and “Blacks in Amercian Medicine” as well as the popular participatory annotation tool “Annotation Studio”. More info can be found at hyperstudio.mit.edu.
"World Music: Global Rhythms app development"
Faculty Advisor: Evan Ziporyn
Mentor(s): Nick Joliat
Contact e-mail: zipo@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
Looking for a student fluent in Python to assist in development of an MITx course "World Music: Global Rhythms". Must have some background in music and willingness to work in a team. Project can begin as early as April 2017 and will continue through fall term 2017.
"Javascript Music Visualization (music21j)"
Faculty Advisor: Michael Scott Cuthbert
Mentor(s): Cuthbert
Contact e-mail: cuthbert@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
Develop interactive musical score projects in Javascript using the music21j Javascript toolkit (created in house).
Strong Javascript skills, ability to write docs and tests, and at least one term of music theory or history a must. Familiarity with Python, CSS, and ES6 helpful. Topics include music score video games, online notation editing, and music visualization. (N.B. This is a musical score-based, not audio/signal-processing lab).
Javascript Music Visualization (music21j)
"Music21: Python Musical Scores"
Faculty Advisor: Michael Scott Cuthbert
Mentor(s): Cuthbert
Contact e-mail: cuthbert@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
Develop new tools for analyzing, manipulating, and composing musical scores in python. Bring together music theory and computer science. Strong python skills, ability to write docs and tests, and at least one term of music theory or history a must. Topics include automatic music recognition, music similarity, solving music theory assignments automatically, music composition. (N.B. This is a musical score-based, not audio/signal-processing lab). Music21: Python Musical Scores
"Digital Governance: Using Big Data to Measure Government Transparency Online"
Faculty Advisor: F. Daniel Hidalgo
Mentor(s):
Contact e-mail: dhidalgo@email.com
Research Area(s):
The adoption of web technologies offers national, regional, and local governments around the world a new way to disseminate information and promote transparency. Important information such as budgets, government salaries, detailed government expenditures, and meeting records can be conveniently posted by government officials and easily accessed by community members and other stakeholders. In recent years, civil society groups have developed transparency standards for local and national governments and have sought to "grade" government websites on the degree to which they meet these standards.

Existing civil society efforts to identify governments who fail to meet these transparency standards have been spotty and episodic due to the time and resources required. To address this problem, a robust and scalable methodology is needed to evaluate government websites. At MIT GOV/LAB, we are creating a “big data framework” for evaluating digital governance at all levels of government, with a focus on local governments. Using an approach driven by machine learning, we hope to effectively classify tens of thousands of government websites in a diverse range of countries. The end goal of this evaluation is to provide data for government administrators, civil society, and the press and to ultimately establish a data-driven standard for government transparency online.
"NoteStream"
Faculty Advisor: Eran Egozy
Mentor(s):
Contact e-mail: egozy@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
NoteStream is a Real-Time program notes web app for live concerts, being developed at the MIT Music Technology Lab. NoteStream provides audience members of a music concert with rich media (text, images, animations) delivered to their mobile phones at precisely timed moments of the live performance. First-time listeners receive simple guided messages that help them focus their attention on musically important moments. Experienced listeners gain new insights into familiar works and can follow along to excerpts from the music score.
See Boston Globe Article:
Link
NoteStream
"Understanding the Complexity of International Trade Policies with Big Data"
Faculty Advisor: In Song Kim
Mentor(s):
Contact e-mail: elishac@mit.edu
Research Area(s):
Countries apply highly different tariffs (import tax) across products. For example, suppose that you are importing a $100 X-men figure from China. You should pay $6.8 tax, as the U.S. government requires 6.8% tariff on “Toys representing animals or other non-human creatures.” On the other hand, if you are importing a $100 Obama figure with a similar size, you will pay $12 tax because it is a “Doll representing only human beings.” If you are importing the same products from South Korea, however, you will pay no tax (duty free) because South Korea is a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) partner.

What explains the differences in trade policies across products and trading partners? This Big Data project investigates how the patterns of trade policies have changed over time by analyzing more than 10 trillion observations. We will apply various clustering algorithms to group countries with similar trade patterns and policies. This project will advance our understandings of economic and political determinants of international trade.

Total: 7

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